Google Bleed Cash in bid to catch up with Baidu

August 16, 2007

Google are going to go into China with cheque book open, and buying a couple of unannounced companies.  (Thanks to the Multilingual search blog for pointing this out).


Is Baidu the perfect stock?

July 30, 2007

I tend to avoid investor articles on Baidu, but this one neatly summarises a certain view of Baidu as a big growth stock.  I don’t agree with the idea that Google doesn’t rate, as they have a large share of the high end of the market.


Google advertises in Games

July 27, 2007

A slightly more general view than usual on this blog.  An entry from Todd Bishop on seattlepi.com talks about Google’s plan to advertise within video games.  This is big for two reasons.  Firstly there’s the general fact that your behaviour in a video game can tell you as much as your search terms can.  The second point is that games are very big in China, in a way that credit cards aren’t – yet.


Google Earth spots Chinese submarine

July 19, 2007

A rather comical piece about how Google Earth managed to break the news of a Chinese nuclear submarine.


China Search Ads on Webmaster Radio

July 10, 2007

James Spencer of China Search Ads will be interviewed on webmasterradio.fm on Thursday 12 July Thursday 5pm Eastern Standard Time, 10pm in the UK.  For other times see http://www.worldtimezone.com/

He talks about Baidu, why Google’s not doing well, online payment, what the Chinese online market is like and even a bit about Alibaba.


Internet Censorship – Bait and Switch

July 9, 2007

The Guardian hosts an old article about Internet censorship, which focuses on China.  There is an interesting bait and switch.  The author talks about Yahoo giving information to Chinese state security used to imprison a dissident – and then condemns Google.  Google’s crime, it seems, is doing any business in China.

At the moment it seems that shareholders and governments are accepting the brute commercial logic that it is not a private company’s business to interfere in another country’s government – but will this last?

Ironically this sort of pressure is most likely to help Baidu and other Chinese search engines that are based in China.